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fourstorylimit:

These Are The Prices AT&T, Verizon and Sprint Charge For Cellphone Wiretaps
Holy fucking shit. They have made a business out of wiretapping cellphones. This reads like an a la carte menu.
Wiretaps cost hundreds of dollars per target every month, generally paid at daily or monthly rates. To wiretap a customer’s phone, T-Mobile charges law enforcement a flat fee of $500 per target. Sprint’s wireless carrier Sprint Nextel requires police pay $400 per “market area” and per “technology” as well as a $10 per day fee, capped at $2,000. AT&T charges a $325 activation fee, plus $5 per day for data and $10 for audio. Verizon charges a $50 administrative fee plus $700 per month, per target.
Data requests for voicemail or text messages cost extra.AT&T demands $150 for access to a target’s voicemail, while Verizon charges $50 for access to text messages. Sprint offers the most detailed breakdown of fees for various kinds of data on a phone, asking $120 for pictures or video, $60 for email, $60 for voice mail and $30 for text messages.
And then they try and pass that off as COGS recovery? 

“Fees are charged to law enforcement in other circumstances such as court ordered requests and it’s important to note that any fee charged is for recovery of cost required to support these law enforcement requests 24/7,” she writes.

I’m not buying that. That’s way to low of a price, and way to cleanly packaged. If these companies cared about their consumer and their privacy, they would be making it painful  and confusing to get access. They wouldn’t have a clean price structure. These companies want the government business. 


Wow

fourstorylimit:

These Are The Prices AT&T, Verizon and Sprint Charge For Cellphone Wiretaps

Holy fucking shit. They have made a business out of wiretapping cellphones. This reads like an a la carte menu.

  • Wiretaps cost hundreds of dollars per target every month, generally paid at daily or monthly rates. To wiretap a customer’s phone, T-Mobile charges law enforcement a flat fee of $500 per target. Sprint’s wireless carrier Sprint Nextel requires police pay $400 per “market area” and per “technology” as well as a $10 per day fee, capped at $2,000. AT&T charges a $325 activation fee, plus $5 per day for data and $10 for audio. Verizon charges a $50 administrative fee plus $700 per month, per target.
  • Data requests for voicemail or text messages cost extra.AT&T demands $150 for access to a target’s voicemail, while Verizon charges $50 for access to text messages. Sprint offers the most detailed breakdown of fees for various kinds of data on a phone, asking $120 for pictures or video, $60 for email, $60 for voice mail and $30 for text messages.

And then they try and pass that off as COGS recovery? 

“Fees are charged to law enforcement in other circumstances such as court ordered requests and it’s important to note that any fee charged is for recovery of cost required to support these law enforcement requests 24/7,” she writes.

I’m not buying that. That’s way to low of a price, and way to cleanly packaged. If these companies cared about their consumer and their privacy, they would be making it painful  and confusing to get access. They wouldn’t have a clean price structure. These companies want the government business. 

Wow

jayrosen:

Should bullshit be called out on air, or would that be “unprofessional? Touré battles Piers Morgan.

That divide isn’t going away. Rarely does it bust into prime-time network television. Rarely do we see anything this raw.

I’m not behind everything Touré says here. If you watch the interview they’re arguing about—Piers Morgan questioning Robert Zimmerman, George Zimmerman’s brother—it’s not nearly as lame as Touré paints it. And I don’t think it’s wise for Touré to rave on about Morgan’s inability to understand America because Piers has been here only a few years. Sometimes outsiders and newcomers see us better.

But… There is a big question on the broadcast journalism table. It involves what a television interviewer should do when he simply doesn’t believe what a guest has just said. Piers Morgan thinks he should ask skeptical questions and let that stand as his “statement.” Touré thinks that’s not good enough. A more direct confrontation is required. (See the Twitter war they had preceding the interview.)

For a long time the journalism world was sold on Morgan’s view. But I don’t think that’s true any more. Views on what counts as “professional” can shift. (See this and this.) It’s conceivable to me that letting a guest make wildly implausible claims will one day fail the Serious Broadcaster test. A good portion of the viewership already expects better, and some of the most careful watchers of the Daily Show’s send-ups are journalists.

Piers Morgan keeps telling Touré that at no point did he signal to us that he believed Robert Zimmerman. To him that means he’s off the hook. But that’s an old hook. The new one is when to tell the audience that this guest cannot be believed.

If I had a prime time show, that would keep me up at night.

cordjefferson:

Trayvon Martin was a 17-year-old kid walking home from a convenience store with an Arizona Iced Tea and a pack of Skittles last month in Orlando. He’d gotten the snacks for his little brother during a break in the NBA All-Star Game. Martin’s grandparents lived in the gated community he was walking through, but that didn’t stop George Zimmerman, the 28-year-old neighborhood watch captain, from tailing Martin in his car and calling the police to tell them a “suspicious person” was in the area. That also didn’t stop Zimmerman from confronting Martin before the police arrived and then shooting the teenager with his 9-mm handgun. By the time police got there, Martin was dead, and Zimmerman was telling everyone he’d acted in self-defense.
It’s now been weeks since a black kid got killed for doing nothing more than trying to get home to see his family, and police have yet to charge or arrest Zimmerman with a single crime.
Yesterday, hundreds of miles from Orlando, New York City Police Commissioner Ray Kelly said the best way he knows of to clean up gun violence in New York is by stopping and frisking random men of color on the street, essentially treating them all like they’re suspicious, dangerous, the kind of people who can be menacing with only a pack of Skittles in their pocket.

cordjefferson:

Trayvon Martin was a 17-year-old kid walking home from a convenience store with an Arizona Iced Tea and a pack of Skittles last month in Orlando. He’d gotten the snacks for his little brother during a break in the NBA All-Star Game. Martin’s grandparents lived in the gated community he was walking through, but that didn’t stop George Zimmerman, the 28-year-old neighborhood watch captain, from tailing Martin in his car and calling the police to tell them a “suspicious person” was in the area. That also didn’t stop Zimmerman from confronting Martin before the police arrived and then shooting the teenager with his 9-mm handgun. By the time police got there, Martin was dead, and Zimmerman was telling everyone he’d acted in self-defense.

It’s now been weeks since a black kid got killed for doing nothing more than trying to get home to see his family, and police have yet to charge or arrest Zimmerman with a single crime.

Yesterday, hundreds of miles from Orlando, New York City Police Commissioner Ray Kelly said the best way he knows of to clean up gun violence in New York is by stopping and frisking random men of color on the street, essentially treating them all like they’re suspicious, dangerous, the kind of people who can be menacing with only a pack of Skittles in their pocket.

apoplecticskeptic:

That Tom Brady safety earned one lucky person $50,000
That’s one lucky-ass prop bet right there.


Wow

apoplecticskeptic:

That Tom Brady safety earned one lucky person $50,000

That’s one lucky-ass prop bet right there.

Wow

Stress

Stress

High times

High times

Love

Love